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Martial Arts Museum plans for February 2024 Re-Opening

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The Martial Arts History Museum has been the home and only museum dedicated to preserving the history of the martial arts worldwide. Now, on the verge of its 25th anniversary, the museum is proud to announce they have acquired a large enough facility in the city of Glendale, CA that will enable them to host large tour groups, school tours, and movie priers.

Founded by former Martial Art Magazine publisher and historian Michael Matsuda, the museum was established in 1999 as a traveling exhibit. In 2008, the museum became a brick-and-mortar facility and since then, it has hosted hundreds of events, shows movie screenings, small children groups, craft fairs, game nights, seminars, and workshops.

Through the walls of the museum, visitors enjoy a uniquely designed facility that reveals the artistry, music, tradition, culture, and history of martial arts. From the early roots of the martial arts until its impact on Western civilization, the museum has enjoyed thousands of visitors every year.

Matsuda, who has been a practitioner of the martial arts since 1967, experienced much of martial arts history since his early childhood. “I have been honored enough to see Gene LeBell wrestle, to be a part of the tail-end of the ‘blood and guts’ era, to experience what it was like to know people like Ark Y. Wong, Bill Ryusaki, and so many pioneers when they first came to the West. Martial arts history is in my blood and to be there when so much happened, makes the museum even more special,” says Matsuda.

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Michael Matsuda

Matsuda was also a contributing editor for both Black Belt and Inside Kung Fu magazines. He has authored over a dozen martial arts books and two dozen video biographies on martial arts pioneers and historical figures. “The museum was designed by some of the greatest designers one could find. From Disney and Dreamworks artists to Halloween designers, it reflects the professionalism of this place,” notes the museum president.

The move to Glendale will be a big step for the museum. Although currently held in a less than 2,000-square-foot facility, the museum has continued to attract large crowds at the many events including book signings, honor days, art exhibits, small concerts, documentaries, and lectures. “The museum also conducts a large number of humanitarian events such as anti-bully events, anti-Asian hate events, special tours for senior centers, and gathering uniforms for the needy,” adds Matsuda.

The Glendale facility, which will be nearly 8,000 square feet, will allow the museum to expand its approach to martial arts history. Currently, because of space limitations, they feature most Asian forms of martial arts. The added space will provide opportunities to include European arts, Native American arts, African arts, and so much more. “Our anime area will expand as well as our ‘martial arts in media’ area will have much more room. Our thrilled to announce we will also have an expanded area for Bruce Lee history as well,” says Matsuda.

The museum is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization and through the years, it has continued to raise funds in hopes of acquiring a larger facility. “This is a dream come true, we won’t be a small museum anymore. Obviously, we have greater plans to expand even more in the near future, but we will happily take this large step for the martial arts community. Martial arts history is being lost and without a museum, without this museum, all our history will be lost forever. If the arts are important to you, then give back by making a donation to the museum,” concludes Matsuda.

The doors for the museum’s current Burbank facility will close in mid-December with hopes of re-opening in Glendale in late February 2024.

For more information or to make a donation, visit their website at http://www.mamuseum.com or call them at (818) 478-1722.

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